Purpose-driven cyber life

Sunday, October 3rd, 2010
 
Entrepreneurial Strategies for Success

The Business of Life Series

Produced in association withlotto_logo

BemoneysmartUSA-logo

       

  

 

  

Banana Moments

Banana Moments

Pursuit of your dreams and achieving your goals requires organization on your part.

Organizing your life requires you to take charge of the things that are in your control and not allow yourself to become manipulated by the agendas and desires of others. 

One big aspect of your life, that requires self-control is how you use the Internet and mobile phones.

In his book, The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains, Nicholas Carr addresses how human inventions are the product of human creativity, and also shape us. For example, the invention of the clock changed the way we live. We used to live and schedule activities by the rising and setting of the sun. Today, we determine schedules according to a 24-hour day measured by the clock.

Photo: xueeueg(Flickr)

Photo: xueeueg(Flickr)

Even more powerfully, the Internet is a high-impact invention that changes the way we think and live.  If we are not mindful, we may surrender our lives to the pace and superficial objectives defined by the Net, not by our own deeper, more meaningful personal objectives and purpose.

Purpose-driven use of the cyber technology is therefore imperative. 

Take control over your cyber life:

Establish a schedule for off-line and on-line activities.

For most of us, the base of our schedule is defined by obligations or commitments. For example, your school schedule and other extra curricular activities will take up the bulk of your time. Beyond that there may be other activities such as family time, church, etc. that automatically command a place in your weekly schedule.

Perhaps you have a part time job, or you hire yourself out for tutoring or some other service. That is also automatically earns a place in your calendar.

Set a schedule for off-line and oon-line activities. Photo:roourtie(Flickr)

Set a schedule for off-line and oon-line activities. Photo:roourtie(Flickr)

Beyond that, you largely determine how the rest of your time is spent. You decide when you will schedule time to do homework and take care of other obligations for family and friends.

Develop a schedule for yourself that makes it possible for you to balance your obligations and commitments, with the pursuit of your goals and objectives.

You can do this by making the time you spend outside of the bulk of your commitments and obligations count for your life.  Some examples of additional things to schedule include:

  • Homework time
  • Exercise
  • Hang out with friends time (including social media and texting).
  • Other hobbies
  • Career development – finding a mentor, working with mentors
  • Entertainment (movies, sports, events)

Text Life Management

Erik Wood, inventor of Otter, with his daughter Eve. Otter text application helps you to take charge of your texting life.

Erik Wood, inventor of Otter, with his daughter Eve. Otter text application helps you to take charge of your texting life.

Texting is very addictive. It’s difficult to put away the phone.

We are all trained to be accessible 24X7.

Heck, our friends will be insulted if we take too long to reply to a text message.

Erik Wood, a Seattle father of two girls, three and five, developed a special text life management application that allows you to enter your scheduled activities so that an automatic reply will be sent to the folks sending you texts that you will get back to them shortly.

You can put down the phone and concentrate on your other business. There are no worries about being perceived inaccessible or non-responsive.

Wood developed this application because his three-year-old daughter Eve was nearly killed by a woman who was texting while driving. “She had no idea what had happened,” said Wood, as he described how the woman drove through the crosswalk completely oblivious of having nearly run over his little girl within an inch. “She looked like she was an upstanding member of the community”, said Wood.

Otter allows you to schedule off-line activities for automatic replies to friends and family.

Otter allows you to schedule off-line activities for automatic replies to friends and family.

At that moment, he realized that this “near miss” was a text life management problem because people are not going to pay attention to driving until they can put texting in perspective with the entire business of life.

So he designed an application that is very affordable ($3.99 for a one time fee), and easy to use.

Learn more about Otter App.

And here is a quick update from Erik Wood:

  • Google’s Android smartphones: Available since April 2010
  • Blackberry smartphones: Available October 4, 2010 (next Monday!)
  • Nokia Ovi Store (worldwide) by December 2010
  • Windows Mobile – we are trying for the end of 2010
  • Apple’s iPhone: the iPhone operating system does not allow 3rd party apps like ours to run freely on their system.
  • ###

    Photo: Christi Benz

    Photo: Christi Benz

    Joanna Jullien jullien@surewest.net

    Joanna married her high school sweetheart and over the  past 25 years they have raised two sons in Roseville, CA. She has a degree from UC Berkeley in Social Anthropology (corporate culture) and has over 20 years experience as a professional manager in information technology, manufacturing, energy and environment.

    Joanna writes on parenting in the 21st century, as she has observed and personally experienced many strains on the parent-child relationship with the advent of the Internet, mobile phones and popular culture.

      Smart Money For Smart Schools      Banana Moments

    Sacramento Cyber Safety Examiner

    Comments are closed.

    About Joanna Jullien

    Joanna Jullien

    Joanna (jullien@surewest.net) and her husband have raised two sons in Roseville, CA. She has a degree from U.C. Berkeley in Social Anthropology (corporate culture). Her honors thesis was awarded the Kroeber Prize and funding from National Science Foundation grant. Joanna writes to help parents with the modern-day leadership challenges of raising children. She is a contributing writer for The Granite Bay View, the Press Tribune, the Sacramento Examiner, and editor of Banana Moments.

    More...