Archive for the 'Teenagers' Category

How social media accounts can reveals signs of a hidden eating disorder

Sunday, February 7th, 2016
Jamie Olivo is a Registered Dietician at the Eating Recovery Center of California in Sacramento. She helps adolescents and adults with eating disorderswhich can be very deadly and easily concealed. Yesterday she spoke to therapists and counselors at a community lunch networking event at ERC’s cafeteria. “Social media is definitely a factor,” she said, “Kids are keeping photos on Instagram that continue to inspire their extreme emotions around food, weight and body size.”

How to ‘get mental” and become a trusted resource for your tech-savvy child

Friday, January 22nd, 2016
Last Thursday, Dr. Alok Banga, Medical Director of Sierra Vista Hospital, delivered a presentation about Mentalization Based Thereapy (MBT) to therapists and counselors, at Sierra Vista Hospital in Sacramento. His explanation of mentalization as “a form of imaginative mental activity about others or oneself,” is instructive for the modern parent challenged with engaging hearts and minds of youth in a world where we are all continually distracted with devices and apps. In short, it is cultivating the capacity to share naked thoughts with another person. It is an intimacy enabled by trust.

Things your tech-savvy teen needs to know about preparing for SAT/ACT tests and college applications

Sunday, January 17th, 2016
Jay Bacrania, is the CEO of Signet Education in Cambridge, New York. He helps college-bound high school students develop and implement a personal strategy to prepare for and pursue a fulfilling college experience. “The internet makes it easier for students to consider applying to numerous places, and far away. It has become a kind of ‘arms race’ where students are applying to eight to ten schools.”

What is ‘digital sympathy’ and why is it important to your teen

Monday, January 11th, 2016
Teens today are digital natives (they cannot imagine the world without the internet), and they do not necessarily perceive the distinction between virtual and physical reality.

Why cyber-powered teens need faith & family more than ever

Saturday, December 26th, 2015
Lincoln resident and Life Coach, Barbara Stahl, is an 80-year-old grandmother, with “an interest in how we become who we are”. She has been studying genes and the human brain for a number of years, and offers a “fast forward” according to how current technology, cultural and biology trends are shaping the condition of our world. Based upon the insights she has gained from personal experience and brain science Stahl offers a very compelling epiphany for the future: “adolescents will be running the world.”

Hopeless in America: Why parents are afraid to let kids grow up

Saturday, December 12th, 2015
A recent article by Naomi Schaefer Riley in the New York Post features the lack of parental confidence in a child’s ability to be responsible for their own security as a type of schizophrenia that looks something like this: little girls are wearing sexy Halloween costumes while college students are calling parents daily to make basic decisions about class courses and campus life. The article points to an “amorphous fear” of a culture that is not geared toward protecting children.

Six deadly habits contributing to shame and eating disorders

Friday, December 4th, 2015
I have spent a great deal of time researching the impact of negative body image messages that our youth face. Whether secular or non-secular, within family systems, the school system, church, social media or literature, many of our youth live within unhealthy, dysfunctional, non-supportive family systems, and thus develop faulty beliefs about themselves and harmful behaviors which can lead to poor self image, unhealthy choices, behaviors to including eating disorders, addiction, process addictions, sex behaviors, and more. As you know from the research, information and trainings of Banana Moments Foundation, the complexity that social media, cyber world activities and the epidemic decline in family values, morality, sexual exploitation further complicate the world through the eyes of our youth. I am passionate about sharing this information to bring about a greater awareness for parents that may be reading this article.

6 tips to improve communication & reduce stress for tech-savvy teens

Wednesday, November 25th, 2015
A Center for Disease Control study on Childhood Stress with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, explains there are three types of stress: positive, tolerable and toxic. Toxic stress is chronic and can lead to health issues. According to the report updated in May 2011: “Toxic stress results from adverse experiences that may be sustained over a long period of time. This kind of stress can disrupt early brain development, compromise the functioning of important biological systems, and lead to long-term health problems.” Along those lines, consider texting and social media as an example of chronic teen stress that can be like peer pressure on steroids and inspire high anxiety. Theresa Thickens,

3 Cyber threats your child can be trained to avoid

Monday, November 23rd, 2015
The concerns of this study are rooted in a simple truth: “When you stand for nothing, you fall for anything” (Alexander Hamilton).

Explaining the ‘downside’ of anonymous apps

Tuesday, November 17th, 2015
As with any innovation, it can be used for good or not good. Motive matters. A recent arrest of a University of Missouri science and technology student for posting threats to the students and faculty via YikYak, a social media app that allows you to post comments anonymously, illustrates this point. The threats were reported to the authorities who were able to trace the source of the comments through GPS metadata. The news feature issued the following warnings to parents:

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About Joanna Jullien

Joanna Jullien

Joanna (jullien@surewest.net) and her husband have raised two sons in Roseville, CA. She has a degree from U.C. Berkeley in Social Anthropology (corporate culture). Her honors thesis was awarded the Kroeber Prize and funding from National Science Foundation grant. Joanna writes to help parents with the modern-day leadership challenges of raising children. She is a contributing writer for The Granite Bay View, the Press Tribune, the Sacramento Examiner, and editor of Banana Moments.

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