Archive for the 'Bullying' Category

Parents posting photos of children on-line can create risks: Why less is more

Monday, February 15th, 2016
A recent Huffington Post article features the modern day problem of parents posting photos to their social media accounts with other people’s children and tagging them. It is a new challenge that requires a restraint, or at least a mindfulness about taking and posting photos. The old adage, just because you can doesn’t mean that you should is demonstrated by this dilemma.

Why your child needs to recognize a lie in order to be cyber safe

Saturday, February 13th, 2016
The William Glasser Institute offers insights about human nature that has practical application for raising tech-savvy kids. Glasser’s Choice Theory describes how every individual has command and control over thoughts and actions, while feelings and the physiological responses (the senses and emotions) to life’s events and experiences individuals do not control -they just happen. This means that we can easily be deceived by the feelings inspired by experiences on and off line.

Top three reasons why parents do not prepare children for internet threats

Monday, January 25th, 2016
Growing up and parenting are deeply affected by cyber connectivity, as children are natural born users of technology which is constantly changing and requiring well-informed adaptation. And so there is much education required on the part of parents in order to provide the guidance kids need in their cyber social realms.

The number one cyber concern for parents and what to do about it

Monday, January 18th, 2016
At the beginning of the year, United Health Care issued a feature about a Pew report survey finding that parents across socio-economic boundaries rank bullying as the number one concern for their children.

Parenting tech-savvy teens information night

Monday, January 18th, 2016
Cross Roads Church Next Generation Pastor, Dan Britton, has invited me to speak to parents of teens at the South Placer Teen Center about the challenge of parenting tech-savvy teens.

Why parents of student athletes should be silent:Tips to avoid the cyberbully effect

Saturday, January 2nd, 2016
...Role clarification is a beautiful thing, and is easily obscured by misplaced desires to be in control of the successes in your child’s sports and school life. Unchecked, the devices beckon us to let it all hang out – all of the mistakes you witnessed your child’s coach make, and the unfair decisions about who to play and when. In the heat of the moment, broadcasting your dismay is a natural impulse. After all if your child’s sports experience is being sullied by someone who doesn’t care about the children like you do, or who is simply not qualified to coach, why sit by and say nothing? ...

Tips to stay in tune with your tech-savvy teen’s life

Monday, December 28th, 2015
Social media and texting can inspire a very isolating experience for youth, with chronic stress that can lead to health issues (such as anxiety and depression). And because cyber technology is in every nook and cranny of our lives, home is no longer a sanctuary.

3 signs that you are ready for your child to have a smart phone

Monday, December 21st, 2015
The most challenging “banana moment” for the modern parent is when to issue your child a smart phone. It is a rite of passage that carries with it privileges, responsibilities and dangers tantamount to handing over the keys to the car. And it happens typically around middle school or upper grammar school grades. One of the reasons why it is so challenging to parent youth with mobile devices is that they are empowered by the feeling of no limits to communication, and they will naturally be resistant to parental oversight – especially when shame-inspired content transpires (i.e., sexting, bullying, gossip). And it is easy to keep secrets because cyber connectivity is so clandestine.

Hopeless in America: Why parents are afraid to let kids grow up

Saturday, December 12th, 2015
A recent article by Naomi Schaefer Riley in the New York Post features the lack of parental confidence in a child’s ability to be responsible for their own security as a type of schizophrenia that looks something like this: little girls are wearing sexy Halloween costumes while college students are calling parents daily to make basic decisions about class courses and campus life. The article points to an “amorphous fear” of a culture that is not geared toward protecting children.

Six deadly habits contributing to shame and eating disorders

Friday, December 4th, 2015
I have spent a great deal of time researching the impact of negative body image messages that our youth face. Whether secular or non-secular, within family systems, the school system, church, social media or literature, many of our youth live within unhealthy, dysfunctional, non-supportive family systems, and thus develop faulty beliefs about themselves and harmful behaviors which can lead to poor self image, unhealthy choices, behaviors to including eating disorders, addiction, process addictions, sex behaviors, and more. As you know from the research, information and trainings of Banana Moments Foundation, the complexity that social media, cyber world activities and the epidemic decline in family values, morality, sexual exploitation further complicate the world through the eyes of our youth. I am passionate about sharing this information to bring about a greater awareness for parents that may be reading this article.

Latest News

Go to Core Connectivity to see current articles and resources.

About Joanna Jullien

Joanna Jullien

Joanna (jullien@surewest.net) and her husband have raised two sons in Roseville, CA. She has a degree from U.C. Berkeley in Social Anthropology (corporate culture). Her honors thesis was awarded the Kroeber Prize and funding from National Science Foundation grant. Joanna writes to help parents with the modern-day leadership challenges of raising children. She is a contributing writer for The Granite Bay View, the Press Tribune, the Sacramento Examiner, and editor of Banana Moments.

More...