Archive for the 'Cyberbullying' Category

The number one cyber concern for parents and what to do about it

Monday, January 18th, 2016
At the beginning of the year, United Health Care issued a feature about a Pew report survey finding that parents across socio-economic boundaries rank bullying as the number one concern for their children.

Parenting tech-savvy teens information night

Monday, January 18th, 2016
Cross Roads Church Next Generation Pastor, Dan Britton, has invited me to speak to parents of teens at the South Placer Teen Center about the challenge of parenting tech-savvy teens.

Tips to stay in tune with your tech-savvy teen’s life

Monday, December 28th, 2015
Social media and texting can inspire a very isolating experience for youth, with chronic stress that can lead to health issues (such as anxiety and depression). And because cyber technology is in every nook and cranny of our lives, home is no longer a sanctuary.

3 signs that you are ready for your child to have a smart phone

Monday, December 21st, 2015
The most challenging “banana moment” for the modern parent is when to issue your child a smart phone. It is a rite of passage that carries with it privileges, responsibilities and dangers tantamount to handing over the keys to the car. And it happens typically around middle school or upper grammar school grades. One of the reasons why it is so challenging to parent youth with mobile devices is that they are empowered by the feeling of no limits to communication, and they will naturally be resistant to parental oversight – especially when shame-inspired content transpires (i.e., sexting, bullying, gossip). And it is easy to keep secrets because cyber connectivity is so clandestine.

Hopeless in America: Why parents are afraid to let kids grow up

Saturday, December 12th, 2015
A recent article by Naomi Schaefer Riley in the New York Post features the lack of parental confidence in a child’s ability to be responsible for their own security as a type of schizophrenia that looks something like this: little girls are wearing sexy Halloween costumes while college students are calling parents daily to make basic decisions about class courses and campus life. The article points to an “amorphous fear” of a culture that is not geared toward protecting children.

Six deadly habits contributing to shame and eating disorders

Friday, December 4th, 2015
I have spent a great deal of time researching the impact of negative body image messages that our youth face. Whether secular or non-secular, within family systems, the school system, church, social media or literature, many of our youth live within unhealthy, dysfunctional, non-supportive family systems, and thus develop faulty beliefs about themselves and harmful behaviors which can lead to poor self image, unhealthy choices, behaviors to including eating disorders, addiction, process addictions, sex behaviors, and more. As you know from the research, information and trainings of Banana Moments Foundation, the complexity that social media, cyber world activities and the epidemic decline in family values, morality, sexual exploitation further complicate the world through the eyes of our youth. I am passionate about sharing this information to bring about a greater awareness for parents that may be reading this article.

Tips to prepare your child for the top 4 internet risks

Tuesday, December 1st, 2015
Christmas time introduces cyber safety concerns for parents whose children are receiving various internet-enabled devices as gifts. And we know that internet connectivity exposes children to adult issues including bullying and exploitation (sexual as well as commercial), so our children must be educated about their own capacity to recognize a lie or a manipulation when they encounter it and respond with confidence. For the most part, cyber safety is a matter of learning how not to engage with or agree with something that disturbs your peace. Accordingly, a post on WebMD featured the top four internet risks for kids. The risks include:

Explaining the ‘downside’ of anonymous apps

Tuesday, November 17th, 2015
As with any innovation, it can be used for good or not good. Motive matters. A recent arrest of a University of Missouri science and technology student for posting threats to the students and faculty via YikYak, a social media app that allows you to post comments anonymously, illustrates this point. The threats were reported to the authorities who were able to trace the source of the comments through GPS metadata. The news feature issued the following warnings to parents:

Help teens to learn how to manage stress in the social network

Saturday, November 7th, 2015
A Center for Disease Control study on Childhood Stress with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, explains there are three types of stress: positive, tolerable and toxic. Toxic stress is chronic and can lead to health issues. According to the report updated in May 2011: “Toxic stress results from adverse experiences that may be sustained over a long period of time. This kind of stress can disrupt early brain development, compromise the functioning of important biological systems, and lead to long-term health problems.” Along those lines, consider texting and social media as an example of chronic teen stress that can be like peer pressure on steroids and inspire high anxiety.

How to enforce social media age restrictions

Monday, November 2nd, 2015
...So the concern from the parent’s point of view, is not trying to keep track of all the possible apps your child may want to use, but to maintain an open dialogue about their interests and build trust about what apps they are allowed to use, when and why. Social media is a very compelling experience, and in their pursuit to seek personal identity and sense of belonging, children at earlier ages can come to believe that in order to be a real person, to be visible, they must have an on-line presence.

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About Joanna Jullien

Joanna Jullien

Joanna (jullien@surewest.net) and her husband have raised two sons in Roseville, CA. She has a degree from U.C. Berkeley in Social Anthropology (corporate culture). Her honors thesis was awarded the Kroeber Prize and funding from National Science Foundation grant. Joanna writes to help parents with the modern-day leadership challenges of raising children. She is a contributing writer for The Granite Bay View, the Press Tribune, the Sacramento Examiner, and editor of Banana Moments.

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