You have more in common with your smartphone than you think

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

Life is Bigger than the Screen by Julia Shohbozian

Photo: Texting by Jhaymesisviphotography via Flickr

Photo: Texting by Jhaymesisviphotography via Flickr

A random thought occurred to me recently: smartphones were meant to do so much more. Think about what Apple and Samsung’s mission statements are. Part of Apple’s is, “-we don’t settle for anything less than excellence in every group in the company, and we have the self-honesty to admit when we’re wrong and the courage to change”. With mission statements that set the bar high for themselves, these companies obviously expect that their technology will serve the human race in a significant and unique way. A way that doesn’t go to waste. But merely sending texts and processing social media apps constantly, doesn’t seem like excellence. We are, unlike majorly successful companies, settling for less than excellence when we spend so much time scrolling through social media.

“…merely sending texts and processing social media apps constantly, doesn’t seem like excellence…What we need to do is explore the capability of our smart phones and our own abilities further.” What is your personal mission?

In what seems like a contradiction, we are similar to these companies in that we in a way, have lofty mission statements for ourselves. It is only human to “reach for the stars” and share our dreams with one another, but we can’t actually make these things reality if we settle for a habitual routine of “liking” and posting. What we need to do is explore our smartphone’s and our own abilities further. This is what Apple and Samsung intended for us to do, to uncover all the amazing things that their technology is capable of; and it is similarly what we intend for ourselves to do. We must have the “self-honesty to admit we’re wrong and the courage to change”. For us, this means being honest with ourselves about what we want, and admitting that we’re wrong to waste brain-power that could be used for great things on social media and other mindless time-killers. Then it comes down to courage, and for me, this really means will-power. I know it is not easy to stop doing something that has become a natural part of your day, but we must have the courage to turn away from it and journey towards something more fulfilling and innovative. So, next time you pick up your smartphone, let it do the great things it is meant to do and instead of opening Instagram, see if you can use it for something that will benefit you a bit more.

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Rocklin resident Julia Shohbozian blogs about a life that is bigger than the screen.

Rocklin resident Julia Shohbozian blogs about a life that is bigger than the screen.

A junior in high school, Julia Shohbozian left her traditional high school campus at the end of her sophomore year, and opted for an independent study program which gives her freedom to take more classes at Sierra College and engage in community work. She serves on the Placer County Youth Commission and the Leadership Committee for the Coalition for Placer Youth.

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James 1:5 If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him.

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About Joanna Jullien

Joanna Jullien

Joanna (jullien@surewest.net) and her husband have raised two sons in Roseville, CA. She has a degree from U.C. Berkeley in Social Anthropology (corporate culture). Her honors thesis was awarded the Kroeber Prize and funding from National Science Foundation grant. Joanna writes to help parents with the modern-day leadership challenges of raising children. She is a contributing writer for The Granite Bay View, the Press Tribune, the Sacramento Examiner, and editor of Banana Moments.

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